Earth Hour and Sea Ice

Earth Hour takes place tomorrow, March 25th, 2017 at 8:30-9:30PM local time. Earth Hour is when people (and organizations) around the globe switch off their lights to show support for the need to take action on climate change. Unfortunately, capturing imagery of the event from space would be almost impossible. The ‘Earth City Lights’ layer is relatively low resolution and created from a large number of images over time. It’s a pity, because an animation of Earth Hour would be interesting given the complicated time zones of the earth.

Given that Earth Hour is about action on climate change, today we are having a look at some recent news from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado. Apparently 2017 saw a new record minimum for sea ice cover. This includes the smallest ‘maximum sea ice cover’ on record for the Northern Hemisphere and the smallest ‘minimum sea ice cover’ for the Southern Hemisphere.

We couldn’t find a KML for 2017 data, but the NSIDC does provide KMLs for 1979-2016 which you can find here.


White: Maximum Arctic Sea Ice extent March, 2016. Purple line: Median maximum extent 1979-2016.

About Timothy Whitehead

Timothy has been using Google Earth since 2004 when it was still called Keyhole before it was renamed Google Earth in 2005 and has been a huge fan ever since. He is a programmer working for Red Wing Aerobatx and lives in Cape Town, South Africa.






PLEASE NOTE: Google Earth Blog is no longer writing regular posts. As a result, we are not accepting new comments or questions about Google Earth. If you have a question, use the official Google Earth and Maps Forums or the Google Earth Community Forums.

Comments

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PLEASE NOTE: Google Earth Blog is no longer writing regular posts. As a result, we are not accepting new comments or questions about Google Earth. If you have a question, use the official Google Earth and Maps Forums or the Google Earth Community Forums.