The best of Google Earth for February 2016

There have been no major imagery updates since mid-January. The latest imagery to be found in ‘historical imagery’ is dated January 11, 2016. However, Google did add an image dated February 2nd, 2016, which includes the stadium where Super Bowl 50 took place. As far as we know, it was the only image added in that update, but it has not been migrated to historical imagery, so we don’t know for sure.

There were some Street View updates, most notably the Island of Réunion, which we covered in yesterday’s post.

3D imagery continues to be rolled out and we had a look at the progress made so far.

Google Earth Traffic layer droppedAt the end of January, Google dropped the three Google Earth Pro only layers. This was because Google Maps Engine was being shut down, as it had been deprecated a year ago. We then discovered that the Google Earth Traffic layer also depended on Google Maps Engine and was also dropped. Judging by the various comments and emails we have received, the US Parcel Data layer and the Traffic layer will be sorely missed by a number of people.

Celebrate Chinese Spring Festival in Google EarthWe had a look at some Google Earth animations created by Steven Ho. We especially liked the Taiwan Lantern Festival animation, as Steven managed to get the lanterns to appear to glow, even though Google Earth does not have a very sophisticated lighting engine. Try them out in Google Earth by going to his blog and specifying the coordinates you would like.

Fixing our circlesWe created a number of JavaScript tools in February for manipulating KML in various ways. We started with a tool for translating and rotating KML. Then we created a tool for labelling polygons. We then tried drawing circles based on three placemarks on the circumference. At first we had a little trouble with accuracy, but were able to fix all the bugs and it now works remarkably well. We also created a tool for classifying placemarks by region and to demonstrate it we used a global map of country outlines which we first needed to convert from the shapefile format.

Space Engine – to Infinity and BeyondFrank wrote a post about Space Engine a ‘Google Earth’ for the universe. If you haven’t tried it out yet, then consider doing so, as it is definitely worth a look. It can be downloaded here.
 
 
 
 

Ghostly planes in Google Earth 3D imageryWe had a look at ghostly images in Google Earth’s 3D imagery and what causes them.
 
 
 
 

Radio Telescopes in Google EarthIn reference to the recent detection of gravity waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), we had a look at LIGO and a variety of other large scientific instruments. We followed that up by having a look at various radio telescopes.
 
 

NASA damage mapsWe had a look at NASA’s ‘damage maps’ of last year’s earthquake in Nepal.
 
 
 
 

Adding pictures to Street ViewWe continued our GEB FAQ series by discussing how to add your own imagery to Street View.
 
 
 
 

Landsat coverage
We had a look at Landsat coverage and found an interesting gap at the antimeridian.
 
 
 

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with Google EarthTo celebrate Valentine’s Day we had a look at various heart-shaped islands in Google Earth
 
 
 

About Timothy Whitehead

Timothy has been using Google Earth since 2004 when it was still called Keyhole before it was renamed Google Earth in 2005 and has been a huge fan ever since. He is a programmer working for Red Wing Aerobatx and lives in Cape Town, South Africa.






PLEASE NOTE: Google Earth Blog is no longer writing regular posts. As a result, we are not accepting new comments or questions about Google Earth. If you have a question, use the official Google Earth and Maps Forums or the Google Earth Community Forums.

Comments

  1. nice article

  2. Robb Westaby says:

    Indeed, the Traffic layer will be missed, as I used it in traffic reports daily to cross-check other speed data sources. This is the first online mention of the loss of the layer, so thanks for the information.

  3. yogesh pawar says:

    Sir,
    I have one doubt when I insert a northing and easting but same coordinate insert with change zone the result two different places comes. So I am confused which was Google earth considering 0,0 base point.
    Because when I used AutoCAD Generally 0,0 was fixed as by default.
    and one another problem I was felt when I insert image in AutoCAD when I put coordinate in longitudinal and latitudinal the image was not correctly set in AutoCAD there was some error found but when I insert degree,minutes & second format in Google earth the image set perfectly.

    So I am confused which meathod use and what was google earth considering 0,0 base point.



PLEASE NOTE: Google Earth Blog is no longer writing regular posts. As a result, we are not accepting new comments or questions about Google Earth. If you have a question, use the official Google Earth and Maps Forums or the Google Earth Community Forums.