Tracking Winter Storm Euclid with Google Earth

A major winter storm is ripping across the eastern United States right now, with blizzard warnings stretching 730 continuous miles. Google Earth offers some great tools for tracking storms such as this, allowing you to really dig in and see what’s going on.
To start, you can enable the “Clouds” and “Radar” layers under the main [Weather] layer to get a look at the current conditions. Using those tools with this storm helps to show just how massive it is:

clouds-radar.jpg

The radar and cloud layers are actually positioned miles above the surface of the planet in Google Earth, allowing you to fly below them to see the original imagery. As a cute bonus feature from Google, if you fly below rain or snow you’ll actually see the precipitation falling when you’re below the clouds. Here is a screenshot with snow falling, though it’s hard to see when it’s a static image:
snow.jpg

To get details for a particular city, simply enable the “Conditions and Forecasts” layer, then click the icon for a city to get a detailed forecast:
detroit-forecast.jpg

Of course, you can also view radar information on your favorite weather site, many of which use Google-powered maps (such as my favorite, the “WunderMap” on Weather Underground).
If you’re affected by this storm, we offer you our best. Stay warm and safe!

About Mickey Mellen

Mickey has been using Google Earth since it was released in 2005, and has created a variety of geo-related sites including Google Earth Hacks. He runs a web design firm in Marietta, GA, where he lives with his wife and two kids.



Comments

  1. Conditions and forecasts is a great feature, with its global coverage (zoom in and more weather stations often appear).
    But clouds and radar is really only for the big picture, and flying under a miles high cloud base is totally unrealistic. It needs to be supplemented by local sources such as Rain today? http://www.raintoday.co.uk/ in the UK and Ireland which shows a very detailed dynamic picture of precipitation – rarely absent ;-) .

  2. Sorry but the miles high clouds are unrealistic, please fix:(

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