Geography Teachers and Google Earth

Ever since Google Earth was first released, I’ve thought teachers of all sorts would find it an indespensible tool for teaching. In particular, I’m sure geography lessons are being transformed by Google Earth. It turns out there are some web sites to help teachers use Google Earth for Geography.
There is a site dedicated to tools on the Internet for enhancing geography called JuicyGeography (www.juicygeography.co.uk) which is written by a teacher in Somerset, England. The teacher has a growing resource for teachers for using Google Earth to teach geography. Included are suggestions for lessons and resources (GE Files and placemarks) to build lessons. One of the most interesting lessons is a decision making exercise letting students evaluate the hazards in an earthquake in San Francisco. Ideas also include doing image overlays, using GIS data, mapping, using GPS, and more.
Another useful geography site from the UK is called GeographyPages.co.uk. The teacher responsible for the site recently was awarded Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers Innovative Geography Teaching Grant. He has also developed an extensive collection of notes and references for using Google Earth to teach.
Looks like the UK educators are first to see the opportunities with Google Earth and start writing about it on the web. Are there other similar web sites for educators who want to use Google Earth? Leave me a comment here, and I’ll write about them in future stories and add them to the Reference section.

About Frank Taylor

Frank Taylor started the Google Earth Blog in July, 2005 shortly after Google Earth was released. He worked in 3D graphics for many years and was very impressed with this exciting product. Frank left in 2009 to circumnavigate the earth by sailboat as part of the Tahina Expedition.



Comments

  1. Google Earth has an amazing amount of resolution, but it is mostly static data from several years ago. The program that I wrote, EarthBrowser (www.earthbrowser.com), has many layers of dynamic data that update several times daily and a simple to use interface. Many schools use EarthBrowser to teach their students about the many dynamic systems that make up our earth. It even has a free unlimited time demo.

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